9 June 2018: MeasureCamp Copenhagen
When using the All Elements trigger in Google Tag Manager, it’s easy to overlook the fact that it captures all clicks on the page. It’s also brutally accurate - it captures clicks on the exact element that was below the mouse button when a click happened. This means that when working with the All Elements trigger, you need to be more careful when identifying the correct element you actually want to track clicks on.

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A while ago, I published a #GTMTips article, where I showed how you can add HTML elements to the page programmatically using Google Tag Manager. This is relevant because GTM’s validators prevent you from adding custom parameters to HTML elements that are injected directly via the Custom HTML tag. To circumvent this validation, you need to create the element programmatically, before appending it to the document. A while ago, Matteo Gamba asked me a question related to the Facebook Customer Chat Plugin.

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Agile analytics isn’t a novel concept in any shape or form. Things like feedback loops and process-oriented development seem to integrate flawlessly into the analytics paradigm, at least on paper. Heck, there’s even the Build-Measure-Learn framework for continuous development. It would be difficult to argue that analytics doesn’t have a role in something with measure in the name! However, past three years of working at Reaktor, one of the world’s top agile technology houses, have introduced me to a whole new set of problems with integrating an “analytics mindset” into an agile workflow, or an “agile mindset” into the analytics process.

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Google Tag Manager supports loading multiple containers on the same page. It’s useful if you have multiple companies or organizations working on the same site, but for one reason or another (e.g. governance) you want to restrict access to your main container. In these situations, having the other party create their own container and adding it to the site is the best of bad options. Well, in Google Tag Manager 360, we now have Zones that make managing multiple partners’ containers quite a bit easier.

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When you use the dataLayer.push() command on a page with a Google Tag Manager container, you pass information to GTM’s internal data model and potentially fire tags (if the push() contained an event key). You can also add the eventCallback key to these pushes. The value of this key should be a function, and this function is then executed once the container finishes processing any tags that might have fired on that dataLayer.

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Last updated 9 March 2018 with some new tips. The Scroll Depth trigger in Google Tag Manager has a lot going for it. Tracking how far users scroll down a given page has long since been recognized as an important cog in the engagement tracking machine, and there have been really great solutions for implementing scroll depth tracking for web analytics over the years. With Google Tag Manager’s native Scroll Depth trigger, it’s tempting to think we now have a be-all end-all solution that covers all the bases.

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One of the annoying quirks of Google Tag Manager is that it strips out any non-standard HTML attributes from elements you add to Custom HTML tags. I’m using “non-standard” as a qualifier here, because I don’t have an exhaustive list of attributes that are ignored. But at least data attributes (e.g. data-id) and attributes with custom names (e.g. aria-labelledby) are either stripped out upon injection, or GTM might actually prevent you from even saving the container if the Custom HTML tag has elements with these attributes.

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Simo Ahava

Husband | Father | Analytics developer
simo (at) simoahava.com

Senior Data Advocate at Reaktor

Finland