20 September 2018: Advanced GTM Workshop (Hamburg)
One of the great ways to leverage Google Tag Manager in your web analytics tracking is to make use of all the possible custom events that the browser has to offer. One such event is beforeunload. It’s dispatched in the browser when the user is about to unload the page. This means, typically, that the user is about to leave the page after clicking a link, or they are about to exit the browser by either closing the tab or the entire window.

Continue reading

A Content Security Policy (CSP) is something you’ll configure your web server with to add an additional layer of protection, especially from harmful scripts loaded from third-party vendors. Once you have a CSP in place, all resources loaded and executed by the web page need to pass the CSP directives. For Google Tag Manager, this is very relevant. If you have a CSP in place, you will need to modify it so that Google Tag Manager functions properly.

Continue reading

Here we are, reunited with customTask. This time, we’ll put this wonderful mechanism to work for a very, very good cause. One of the lesser known “features” of Google Analytics is that when the payload size (the request body that is actually sent to Google Analytics with each request) goes past a certain limit, specifically 8192 bytes, the hit is aborted without warning. This can come as a surprise, because there’s no indication anywhere in Google Analytics that you are missing hits because of this.

Continue reading

After writing yet another customTask article on how to respect client-side opt-out using Google Analytics and Google Tag Manager, the analytics.js core library was enhanced with a new field that makes it all a lot easier to do. The field, allowAdFeatures, lets you either allow or block the request to DoubleClick that is initiated when Advertising Features have been enabled. In this very short article, I’ll quickly show you what the field does and why it’s useful.

Continue reading

One of my favorite (and most popular) articles in my blog is Improve Data Collection With Four Custom Dimensions. In that article, I show how you can improve the quality and granularity of your Google Analytics data set with just four Custom Dimensions. The reason I chose the four dimensions (Hit Timestamp, Session ID, Client ID, and User ID) is because I firmly believe that they should be in Google Analytics’ standard set of dimensions, but for some inexplicable reason they aren’t.

Continue reading

I’ve spent a considerable amount of time talking and writing about how to improve the granularity of your Google Analytics data, especially when using Google Tag Manager. I’ve also gone on and on and on (and on) about customTask, which makes adding metadata to the Google Analytics hits dispatched from your website a breeze. In this article, I’ll introduce a simple way to add yet another level of detail to your GA hits, using customTask as the method of choice.

Continue reading

When working with the analytics of single-page applications (SPA), there are a number of things to pay attention to. For example, you need to make sure that Google Analytics doesn’t break your session attribution, and that you are not inadvertently inflating your page speed timing metrics. Actually, there are so many “gotchas” when it comes to SPA tracking in tools like Google Analytics that you just can’t get by with a plug-and-play implementation.

Continue reading

Author's picture

Simo Ahava

Husband | Father | Analytics developer
simo (at) simoahava.com

Senior Data Advocate at Reaktor

Finland