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In this article, Jethro Nederhof of Snowflake Analytics fame and I will introduce you to some pretty neat web browser APIs. The purpose of these APIs is to find out more about how the user navigated to the current page, and what’s going on with their browser tabs. There are so many things you can do with this new information. You can build proper navigational path reports, rather than rely on the fuzzy and often incoherent flow reports in Google Analytics.

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Here’s a quick tip in response to a query in Twitter by Riccardo Mares. By making a small change to the Google Tag Manager container snippet, you can have the <script> element generated by the snippet notify the page as soon as the Google Tag Manager library has downloaded. Hi @SimoAhava is possible in javascript (from the page) to check (or hook) when GTM has been loaded? Thanks. — Merlinox (@merlinox) April 13, 2018 What you do with this information is up to you.

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Here’s a hacky #GTMTips tip for you. Have you ever had a Google Tag Manager container, where you’ve been updating your Google Analytics tags over the years? And perhaps these tags (and, today, Google Analytics Settings variables) have been updated with an ever-expanding list of Custom Dimensions? And perhaps this list of Custom Dimensions is sorted willy-nilly, because once you have 50+ rows, it just doesn’t seem like a fun thing to do to go over each row and update them so that they are sorted by Custom Dimension index?

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Maybe you knew this, maybe you didn’t, but requests sent from your website (or app) to Google Analytics have a maximum size. Or, more specifically, the payload size (meaning the actual content body of the request) has a maximum. This maximum size of the payload is 8192 bytes. This means, basically, that the entire parameter string sent to Google Analytics servers can be no longer than 8192 characters in length.

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When using the All Elements trigger in Google Tag Manager, it’s easy to overlook the fact that it captures all clicks on the page. It’s also brutally accurate - it captures clicks on the exact element that was below the mouse button when a click happened. This means that when working with the All Elements trigger, you need to be more careful when identifying the correct element you actually want to track clicks on.

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A while ago, I published a #GTMTips article, where I showed how you can add HTML elements to the page programmatically using Google Tag Manager. This is relevant because GTM’s validators prevent you from adding custom parameters to HTML elements that are injected directly via the Custom HTML tag. To circumvent this validation, you need to create the element programmatically, before appending it to the document. A while ago, Matteo Gamba asked me a question related to the Facebook Customer Chat Plugin.

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Google Tag Manager supports loading multiple containers on the same page. It’s useful if you have multiple companies or organizations working on the same site, but for one reason or another (e.g. governance) you want to restrict access to your main container. In these situations, having the other party create their own container and adding it to the site is the best of bad options. Well, in Google Tag Manager 360, we now have Zones that make managing multiple partners’ containers quite a bit easier.

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Simo Ahava

Husband | Father | Analytics developer
simo (at) simoahava.com

Senior Data Advocate at Reaktor

Finland